Picture the following scene: you are training a client and he or she is doing a set of step ups.  Everything is going well until she steps down, trips, and rolls her ankle. It’s not a serious injury,  just a minor ankle tweak. Before you have time to suggest a treatment plan, the client asks if you have ice to put on the injury. This happens all too often and I’m sure you have experienced similar circumstances.

In my early years as a trainer I would agree with this client and recommend ice to help treat injuries. But in the last five years or so my thoughts on this have changed dramatically when I was introduced to Gary Reinl on Kelly Starrett’s Mobilitywod.com. Reinl, the author of “Iced: The Illusionary Treatment Option” and the leader of he anti-ice revolution, sums up the facts on treating injuries with ice with the following exert from his book: “The bottom line is that after forty years of widespread use, there is no peer-reviewed indisputable evidence that icing damaged tissue improves patient outcomes.”

Reinl also has come up with a simple and helpful acronym to replace the decades-old and now irrelevant R.I.C.E. (Rest Ice Compression Elevation) – ARITA (Active Recovery Is The Answer).  Active recovery is the practice of loading the muscles through light movement with the absence of intensity that will further damage the tissue. I now personally incorporate this strategy for client injuries and my own personal setbacks. My favorite active recovery mode is simply riding the Air Assault or row machine at a low intensity. I have also had similar luck using bands, electric muscle stimulation machines, and light even free weights. The natural tendency when you are dealing with a minor injury is to do nothing. But when we don’t move, we won’t get the necessary blood flow to the affected area, and the swelling that wreaks havoc with the injured tissue won’t go away.  Next time you have a client that is dealing with a minor injury keep ARITA in mind.

PS: To get a streamlined list of other things that will help you get fit, make sure to check out my free e book “Three Underground Secrets for Easier Fat Loss: A Checklist for Busy, Active Parents” by clicking http://www.successstoriesfitness.com/free-ebook/.

I know you have dreams, but having dreams and turning them into action are two completely different animals.

A dream turns into a goal when concrete actions are taken to accomplish something that resonates inside of you.

Setting goals that are important to you and accomplishing them will strengthen your self-trust as well as self-esteem.

This is part of becoming a well adjusted, happy human being.

You can use the acronym SMART to remember the basics of goal setting:

Be Specific with a Measurable goal that is Attainable, Relevant, and Time-Specific.

Here are more goal-setting tips that will help you with your journey:

  1. Start with what you want: “I want to lose weight this year.”
  2. Figure out the measurable steps that will help you reach your goal: “I will have to eat and drink less so as to put myself into a caloric deficit.”
  3. Determine what you have to do to achieve your goal: ” I will track everything I put into my body for three days so I know approximately how much I’m currently taking in and then eat less so I will start losing.”

Goal setting typically starts with wishful thinking.

You have to turn the thinking into a concrete action plan, and that’s what makes it a goal!

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-Coach John
Successstories Fitness and Weight Loss

Make the goal something that is important to you, something that will get you out of bed an hour early in the morning.

If the thought of doing the work doesn’t get you excited, you may want to re-think your goal.